News

New 232nd Street bridge now open

Bruce Erwood, equipment operator with GCL Contracting & Engineering Inc., left, and Brad Wallace, labourer, put the finishing touches on the new bridge along 232nd Street at Fern Crescent on Friday. The bridge opened to traffic on Tuesday. - Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
Bruce Erwood, equipment operator with GCL Contracting & Engineering Inc., left, and Brad Wallace, labourer, put the finishing touches on the new bridge along 232nd Street at Fern Crescent on Friday. The bridge opened to traffic on Tuesday.
— image credit: Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS

Silver Valley residents have a quicker way home now that another new bridge is open in Maple Ridge.

The new 232nd Street bridge over the North Alouette River opened Monday, a few years after a new bridge was built over the South Alouette River.

GCL Contracting from Chilliwack built the new bridge, which has two lanes, but capable of expanding to four, when needed.

Construction started in July, with traffic headed to Silver Valley detoured on to 224th Street.

Included in the project are two multi-use lanes for cyclists and pedestrians on either side.

Municipal engineer Dave Pollock said the previous bridge was about 70 years old.

“It was time for it to be replaced. We had to restrict heavy trucks going over it.”

The total span of the bridge will be about 35 metres, with no piers in the water, minimizing any impact on fish.

The bridge is the largest of improvements in the area, but soon to follow is a temporary sidewalk on the west side of 232nd from 132nd Avenue up to Silver Valley.

Widening of 232nd Street to four lanes from 132nd Avenue to 124th Avenue is also in the works.

The next bridge on the district’s to-do list is over the North Alouette River at 224th Street. That’s about three years away, however.

The district also built a new $5-million four-lane bridge over Kanaka Creek on 240th Street in January 2010.

After that, in several years time, another possible new river crossing could be over the Alouette River at 240th Street but that will be a pricey project with 2010 price estimates for that at $31 million.

 

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