B.C. Transportation Minister Claire Trevena (Black Press)

B.C. bus service applications to be fast-tracked after Greyhound pullout

Greyhound’s departure leaves few options for small communities

The B.C. Passenger Transportation Board will move applications “to the front of the line” encourage inter-city bus companies to pick up routes that Greyhound Canada leaves behind at the end of October.

An “urgent public need process” is available for rural or remote corridors, where applicants don’t have to publish the required notice to be considered, said Catharine Read, chair of the board, in a statement Wednesday.

Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said Tuesday she expects “nimble and quick” response from smaller bus services to fill in the gap left by Greyhound’s departure.

The application procedure is explained on the board’s website.

Trevena said the solution would not be an expansion of B.C. Transit services.

RELATED: Market can fill Greyhound vacuum, minister says

Greyhound Canada announced last week it is shutting down all service from northern Ontario west. It had earlier stopped routes in northern B.C. and on Vancouver Island.

BC Transit’s service on Highway 16 to replace Greyhound service that ended in June is a pilot project for that region only, and private services are being sought to take up the other areas, Trevena said.

The last Greyhound bus pulled out of Terrace on June 1 with a single passenger on board, symbolizing the struggle of long-haul bus service in parts of the province. B.C.’s Passenger Transportation Board approved cancelling seven B.C. routes that Greyhound said had accumulated losses of $70 million in the past six years.

B.C. Bus North began interim service on June 4, with two round trips a week between Prince Rupert and Prince George, Prince George and Valemount and Prince George to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.

Just Posted

Untrending: A good place to start my search

Facebook offers a legacy service.

Pitt Meadows ties weather record for warmth

Ties mark set on Friday, Nov. 16, 1999.

OUTLOOK: $150 million Pitt Meadows CP Rail project marches forward

City council prepares to address citizen concerns

Salvation Army Kettle Campaign kicks off

Volunteers needed in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows

Could whistle have saved Maple Ridge train victim?

Maple Ridge silenced trains, woman hit and killed Wednesday

Trudeau offers to help Pacific islands face climate change impact

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with the leaders from the Pacific island nations on Saturday during the APEC Summit in Papua New Guinea

Canada defeats Germany 29-10 in repechage, moves step closer to Rugby World Cup

Hong Kong needs a bonus-point win over Canada — scoring four or more tries — while denying the Canadians a bonus point

Avalanche Canada in desperate need of funding

The organization provides avalanche forecasting for an area larger than the United Kingdom

5 B.C. cities break temperature records

Parts of B.C. remain warm, at 10 C, while others feeling chilly

B.C. teacher’s Amazing Race takes students on Canada-wide adventure

Agassiz high school students say they had the experience of a life time

Don’t sign USMCA until LGBTQ language excised, U.S. lawmakers urge Trump

The trade agreement, forged after 13 months of tense negotiations between Canada and the U.S. is scheduled for Nov. 30

US official: US intel says prince ordered Khashoggi killing

Vice-President Mike Pence told reporters that ‘the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity.’

Giants serve up major defeat to Pats at Langley Events Centre

On the ice, Vancouver G-Men wrap up home stand with a 10-4 win over Regina Friday night.

Most Read