Lumber trade ‘injury’ claim upheld by U.S.

Softwood lumber dispute escalates as president-elect Donald Trump begins actions to protect American jobs

B.C. Forests Minister Steve Thomson

The B.C. government will continue efforts to negotiate a new softwood lumber trade agreement, after the U.S. International Trade Commission upheld the U.S. industry’s claim of “injury” due to alleged unfair trade practices by Canadian producers.

The latest complaint, the fifth by the U.S. lumber industry, accuses B.C. and other provinces of “dumping” lumber below market value, and subsidies based on the price of logs on Crown land.

The finding means the U.S. could impose countervailing duties as early as February on B.C. lumber exports, which make up half of Canada’s sales to the U.S. It also means the U.S. Department of Commerce will continue its investigation of Canada and its producers.

Forest products are part of the economy for 140 communities and provide 65,000 jobs in B.C. Forests Minister Steve Thomson said trade protection would increase lumber prices for U.S. builders as their housing market recovers.

“These are allegations that, time after time, have been proven to be false before NAFTA and World Trade Organization tribunals,” Thomson said in response to Friday’s ruling in the U.S. “B.C.’s forest policies are trade compliant.”

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to renegotiate NAFTA, which does not cover softwood lumber trade, and has already begun threatening steep tariffs in the vehicle assembly industry to protect domestic jobs.

 

Just Posted

First two days of advance voting up 25 per cent

Polls busy including Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge

Council wants more details on Maple Ridge transport plan

Wants clarification from TransLink on roads, mass transit

Premier in Maple Ridge for new school announcement

Horgan at new school opening, announces funding to buy new site

Knights junior bantams move into first place

Ridge Meadows gets huge 62-0 win over Chilliwack Giants

BEING YOUNG: Holiday jobs key for many youth

Young people have much to offer employers, even on a part-time basis

VIDEO: #MeToo leader launches new hashtag to mobilize U.S. voters

Tarana Burke hopes to prompt moderators to ask about sexual violence at next debate

Potent power play paces Canucks to 5-1 win over Detroit

Miller nets a pair as Vancouver wins third straight

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

$100,000 reward for B.C. gangster extended to United States

Police belive fugitive Conor D’Monte may be in the Los Angeles area

Emily Carr University closed Sunday after fire causes some damage

The school is working with Vancouver police to assist their investigation into the fire

Most Read