FILE – The Toronto Stock Exchange Broadcast Centre is shown in Toronto on June 28, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

North American stock markets surge higher in early trading after crash on Monday

Stock markets nose-dived on Monday as crude oil prices sank to a four-year low

Canada’s main stock index was up 400 points in early trading Tuesday, a day after the Toronto Stock Exchange posted its biggest one-day loss since 1987, triggered by a collapse in oil prices.

The S&P/TSX composite index was up 429.47 points at 14,943.71 after gaining more than 500 points at the open.

Stock markets nose-dived on Monday as crude oil prices sank to a four-year low after Russia refused over the weekend to roll back production and Saudi Arabia responded by launching a crude price war by vowing to ramp up output.

The drop in oil rattled already jittery markets that had been under pressure due to concerns about the economic impact of the spread of the novel coronavirus that began in China.

It was a broad-based rally on Tuesday including the energy sector which suffered big losses on Monday. However, gains by several of the big names in Canada’s energy sector fell short of the previous day’s declines.

Shares in Suncor Energy Inc. were up 71 cents at $28.27 in early trading after falling nearly 18 per cent on Monday. Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., which lost nearly 30 per cent, regained 64 cents at $22.07.

In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 701.91 points at 24,552.93. The S&P 500 index was up 81.36 points at 2,827.92, while the Nasdaq composite was up 242.62 points at 8,193.30.

The Canadian dollar traded for 73.10 cents US compared with an average of 73.54 cents US on Monday.

The April crude contract was up US$2.53 at US$33.66 per barrel and the April natural gas contract was up 11.2 cents at US$1.890 per mmBTU.

The April gold contract was down US$21.60 at US$1,654.0 an ounce and the May copper contract was up 2.15 cents at US$2.5320 a pound.

READ MORE: Feds have fiscal room to react to impacts of COVID-19, says Bill Morneau

READ MORE: Stocks slide on Wall Street over coronavirus and oil crash

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronaviruseconomy

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

LETTER: What’s happening to key staff at The ACT?

While arts centre prepares for slow re-opening, it will apparently do it without a few key people

LOOKING BACK: Pitt Meadows Day can’t afford another five-year hiatus

A flood in 1948 derailed this community festival for five years, now 68 years later COVID does same

LETTER: Hospice takeover seen as socialist fascism

One Maple Ridge letter writer views NDP’s stance on MAIDs as imposed tyranny

LETTER: Forget danger pay, be grateful to have a job

Retired firefighter critical of lab worker’s call for COVID-related top up

LETTER: Glad voters didn’t pick Mowatt

Letter writer suddenly grateful for outcome of 2014 mayoralty race in Maple Ridge

Vancouver Island bride held wedding in seniors home so dying stepdad could walk her down aisle

Ceremony held amidst pandemic in order to fulfill bride’s wish to have stepdad give her away

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Thanks for helping The News to continue its mission to provide trusted local news

COVID-19 cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a B.C. mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Yukon ready to lift COVID travel restrictions with B.C. in July: premier

Premier Sandy Silver says the territory’s health-care system can cope with the virus.

‘It is dire:’ Study finds B.C. logging continues on critical caribou habitat

The federal Species At Risk Act requires provinces to identify critical habitat for caribou herds

Langley Lodge ordered to swab all residents staff, new cases discovered

Four new cases – two residents and two staff – have been confirmed at the long-term care home

Grieving together, but apart: How funeral homes are handling the pandemic

‘Hugs are so important and right now hugs can’t happen’

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

Most Read