Nadine Sands (left) was recently honoured by the ALS Society of B.C. for her advocacy work.

Nadine Sands (left) was recently honoured by the ALS Society of B.C. for her advocacy work.

Maple Ridge resident wins ALS Exceptional Advocacy Award

The ALS Society of B.C. raises funds to provide direct services and support to those currently living with ALS and ALS research.

Nadine Sands of Maple Ridge has been honored by the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society of British Columbia with its Exceptional Advocacy Award.

The award celebrates exceptional advocacy initiatives that seek to improve quality of life for people with ALS, sometimes known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, during the previous 12 months.

Sands was awarded for her advocacy to support others living with ALS. After her husband Mike was diagnosed with ALS, they started a blog, ALS With Courage, and a book, Hold on Let Go, to bring attention to their journey living with ALS.

She spoke at the ALS memorial golf tournament dinner earlier this month on what her life was like as a caregiver for her late husband. She presented her story at an ALS Psychological Treatment program recruitment session.

“Her moving story and passion for making a difference resulted in six new psychological support providers joining the ALS Society of B.C. psychological treatment program, said Wendy Toyer, executive director of the ALS Society of B.C.

“Nadine inspires everyone she meets.”

The ALS Society of B.C. raises funds to provide direct services and support to those currently living with ALS and ALS research.

ALS is a rapidly progressive, neuromuscular disease. It attacks the motor neurons that transmit electrical impulses from the brain to the voluntary muscles in the body. When they fail to receive messages, the muscles lose strength, atrophy and die. ALS can strike anyone at any time, regardless of age, gender, or ethnic origin. It does not affect the senses, and only rarely does it affect the mind.