Vicki McLeod.

Untrending: Welcome to the age of domotics

‘Smart home systems might even ensure a cleaned cat litter box.’

As a result of advances in sophisticated artificial intelligence and machine learning, automation and augmented reality, the Internet landscape is undergoing massive change.

It’s no longer just about accessing information via electronic devices such as laptops, smartphones, and tablets. From toasters to transit systems, we are now in the age of the ‘Internet of Things,’ where interconnected devices and objects are fully networked and communicate data back and forth. Devices and objects learn from these data exchanges and adapt and respond to our personal needs and preferences.

I’m researching a new book, and one of the terms I’ll be dealing with is “domotics.” Domotics (from the Latin word domus, meaning house), combines domus with robotics, and is the term used to describe all phases of smart home technology.

Domotics is the process or set of tools that comprises all the information technology, electrotechnics and electronics, including highly sophisticated sensors and controls that monitor and automate temperature, lighting, security systems, and many other aspects of a smart home.

READ ALSO: Losing our ability to ‘moodle.’

A smart house is one where these highly automated systems govern the kind of functions listed above. The list doesn’t stop there. The integration of these technologies goes beyond obvious tasks such as turning lights off and on at pre-programmed times or automatically adjusting air conditioning or heating. Highly advanced systems will allow us to monitor and inventory the foodstuffs in our fridges, track menus and meal plans and routinely order groceries, for example.

READ ALSO: Catching the video wave.

In an article for ThoughtCo, a leading online reference and education site, author Jackie Craven suggests that “the smart home systems might even ensure a continuously cleaned cat litter box or a house plant that is forever watered.”

Extending the implications of this, wearable (or implanted?) sensors may be able to monitor who is in the home, and where, adjusting the environment based on the needs and preferences of the wearer.

We already use such tracking devices to keep track of iPhones, keys, and pets. How might this improve the lifestyle of the elderly aging-in-place, or people with disabilities?

As well, many of us are already employing smart technologies as part of a regular domestic routine. You probably already have a smart thermostat, or a garage door that will automatically close. Does your coffeepot come on at a prescheduled time in the morning? These are examples of embedded smart technology. Smart speaker sales are booming, and double-digit growth is expected over the next five years in home network hubs such as Amazon’s Alexa or Google Home.

There is still some distance to go in terms of an efficient and affordable fully networked smart home. Even though appliances and devices are equipped with the necessary microchips and enabling technology, the tools and protocols are not standardized to enable devices with different vendor origins to communicate effectively. Yet.

Smartphone apps, communication hubs and cloud-based services are already enabling us to control many elements of domestic life remotely.

Full integration is not far behind.

Vicki McLeod is an author, TEDx speaker, and award-winning entrepreneur. She is a business and personal coach and consultant. Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or find her at vickimcleod.com.

Just Posted

Maple Ridge’s Tiller’s Folly kick off international music series in Surrey

Come Dancing Around the World takes place at the Surrey Arts Centre

Rescuers battle fog, wind, rain on stormy Maple Ridge mountain

Four hikers rescued Sunday in Golden Ears park

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

U.S. student, killed in Bamfield bus crash, remembered as ‘kind, intelligent, talented’

John Geerdes, 18, was one of two UVic students killed in the crash on Friday night

Free Tesla 3 offered with purchase of Surrey townhome

Century Group’s offer for Viridian development runs through Oct. 31

B.C. communities urged to improve access for disabled people

One in four B.C. residents has disability, most want to work

Sikh millworker lodges human rights complaint against Interfor, again

Mander Sohal, fired from Delta’s Acorn Mill, alleges discrimination based on religion and disability

UVic students killed in Bamfield bus crash were from Winnipeg, Iowa City

Authorities said the two victims were a man and a woman, both aged 18

Safety concerns resurface after fatal bus crash on Vancouver Island

Huu-ay-aht First Nations wants a safe route between Bamfield and Port Alberni

National weather forecasters predict average fall, cold winter

The Weather Network says precipitation will about average in most parts of Canada

Most Read