VIDEO: Langley clinic demonstrates how to give a pit bull a blood test

Canine blood donor clinic involves ‘bully breeds’ at Animal Emergency Clinic of the Fraser Valley

Mira was in a good mood when she arrived at the Animal Emergency Clinic of the Fraser Valley in Langley on Saturday morning, tail wagging and tongue flapping as she all but dragged her human, Lauren Pagan to the entrance.

The three-year-old brindle Bully breed maintained her good nature during the blood test that followed, a procedure that involved a needle briefly applied to her neck.

It probably helped that some tasty canine treats were involved and her human was there for hugs.

“Good girl,” Pagan said.

“That’s awesome.”

As it turned out, Mira was an especially valuable potential donor, with a universal blood type that can be used for any dog.

Mira was the first potential donor to be tested at the weekend blood donor drive being run by the clinic with the HugAbull Rescue Society.

The 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday event at the facility, #306 6325 204 St., was booked solid this weekend, but efforts would be made to accommodate drop-ins, organizers said.

The clinic runs a donor program in which dogs and cats donate blood to help sick and injured animals — not only at the Langley hospital, but all over the Lower Mainland.

Suitable donors for the weekend event included any dog weighing more than 30 pounds, as well as bigger dogs in the bully breed category including Staffordshires, American bulldogs, bull mastiffs, bull terriers, and boxers.

Once blood is collected, it is processed and either shipped to a hospital or stored at the clinic to be used either for its own patients or to be on hand for an emergency at another clinic.

“Blood can be stored for five to six weeks, and plasma can be stored for up to five years when frozen.

It is the first drive at the clinic that is breed-specific.

“We wanted to shed some positive light on the Bully breeds and the pit bulls,” said Alicia Gulbransen, of the clinic blood services program.

Blood from any dog breed can be used to help any other dog, no matter the type or size, so long as they are a compatible blood type or a universal donor like Mira.

HugAbull rescues pitbull dogs, provides public education, and, the society notes, “builds a community of responsible pitbull owners and supporters.”

RELATED: Dogs giving blood for great cause Saturday and Sunday in Langley

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dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

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