Homes: Spring is the season most people move

But there are ways to make the big change a little easier on everyone involved

  • Apr. 16, 2015 8:00 p.m.

Most people don't enjoy the chore of moving.

While there are many reasons to look forward to spring in the North Fraser region, there’s one that often makes this season tough to take — moving.

Whether it’s to downsize, buy or sell a home, or rent an apartment, spring is the season most people move into new digs.

But there are ways to make the big change a little easier on everyone involved.

Perhaps the easiest way to do that is to hire professional movers, pack up your belongings, then let the pros do the lifting.

But if professional movers are too expensive an option for you, then you’ll likely depend on friends and family members to give you a hand on moving day.

And friends or family who are willing to give up their free time to help you move have to be treated right to make an otherwise arduous task a little more fun for you and them.

Moving is one of the biggest household tasks there is. But if you can get a head start, and stay organized, you should make it through this enormous process unscathed and ready to enjoy your new home.

So do some preliminary groundwork ahead of time to ensure the day runs smoothly and confusion-free.

Sending out a request for help, to as many folks as you can, is a good way to line up your help. The more who show up, the easier the day will be for everyone involved. You can send polite reminders, and promise good food, drinks, as well as your services in return.

Here are some moving tips to help your move goes efficiently:

Organize early: avoid leaving anything till the last minute.

Unless you have to pack up and leave in a hurry, chances are you have 30-60 days to formulate a plan and ensure you’re your moving day runs smoothly. Create a countdown list and itemize everything you need to accomplish week by week.

Strategize: how are you going to get your stuff from your current home to your new home on moving day?

For shorter moves, you’ll either need to assemble some nice friends with trucks, or consider renting a truck for the day. If you have a big family to move, or you’re moving a long distance, you’ll want to price out moving companies. You may be able to get away with making more than one trip if you’re only moving a short distance. But you’ll need to ensure you have the right size of truck to carry your belongings if you’re only making one trip a longer distance.

Generally speaking, the contents of bachelor or one-bedroom apartment will fit in a 16-foot cube truck, which available at your local rental company. But two to three fully furnished bedrooms will require a 24- to 26-foot truck to do your move in one load. The contents of most houses can be moved in the same 24-foot truck with one or two trips.

Communicate with movers: boxes are one thing, but when you get to the big, heavy stuff, it’s important to let your movers know what to expect.

Explain all the requirements and expectations prior to booking your mover. They have to be aware of all the details in order to estimate your total move time and cost, and have proper equipment available. That includes informing the company about any overweight items (like a piano or a fridge), access restrictions (elevators, walk-up only, narrow driveways) and whether you’ll need help disassembling or assembling furniture.

This represents just the beginning of your move planning. More tips will be offered in two weeks.

Kevin Gillies is a freelance writer for Black Press.

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