Maple Ridge Seniors Village works with residents living with dementia and staff understand how important it is to maintain a tight-knit community and nurturing environment.

Retirement Concepts’ Maple Ridge Seniors Village focuses on residents living with dementia

Campus of care for adults with dementia

The number of Canadians with dementia is rising sharply as reported by the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada. According to their statistics, as of 2016, an estimated 564,000 Canadians are currently living with dementia. They have estimated there are 25,000 new diagnosis made each year and that the overall number of people living with dementia will rise to 937,000 by 2031.

Dementia is an umbrella term for symptoms caused by disorders effecting the brain. These symptoms can include: memory loss, difficulties thinking, problem solving and communicating. Normally these indicators are severe enough that they affect everyday life and can result in loss of cognitive and social functioning.

There are many different types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s Disease, vascular dementia and Parkinson’s disease dementia just to name a few, all of which are progressive.

Retirement Concepts’ Maple Ridge Seniors Village has been working with residents who live with dementia for several years. The staff understand how important it is to maintain their tight-knit community and campus-of-care nurturing environment that includes 24-hour available assistance with a special emphasis on medication counselling, thereby removing the risk of adverse reactions when medication is taken incorrectly. Highly skilled practitioners work with family members to determine the needs and goals of their seniors and engage them in recreational activities that help their physical, intellectual, emotional, spiritual and social being.

At all of the Retirement Concepts communities, families inherently recognise that their loved ones are living in a safe and respectful environment with the stability of regular routines and are receiving the help that they need round-the-clock.

For those living with dementia, it is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle and stay as active as possible while enjoying hobbies and activities that have always been enjoyed. There are many ways that people with dementia can stay active. Activities such as singing, painting, dancing and knitting are just a few examples of activities that can help seniors with dementia.

Therapeutic recreation, also known as recreational therapy, can also play an integral role in the lives of people living with dementia by keeping them active and involved in their communities.

For those individuals, recreational therapy offers them the opportunity to sustain important skills and behaviours that will then enable them to engage in quality leisure and recreation experiences in the most favourable of ways.

Therapeutic Recreation has been known to have many benefits, including improving cognitive function and emotional well-being as well as having physical and social benefits. Communities at Retirement Concepts have a Therapeutic Recreation Practitioner on hand each day to engage their seniors and to encourage cognitive function and involve seniors in activities to keep the mind active.

Having a great support system can also play a fundamental role in maintaining a high quality-of-life for those living with dementia, and that is provided in abundance at Retirement Concepts communities.

Maple Ridge Seniors Village in Maple Ridge is a campus of care for adults with dementia. To make an appointment to visit the community, call 604-466-3053 or visit retirementconcepts.com for more information.

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