The proposed $175-million WesPac Tilbury LNG jetty in Delta would load tankers with LNG produced at the adjacent FortisBC plant.

B.C. to head review of LNG terminal on Fraser River

Activists distrust province, had hoped feds would oversee WesPac Tilbury LNG assessment

The federal government has decided B.C. will lead the environmental assessment  into the proposed WesPac Tilbury LNG jetty that would bring liquefied natural gas ships into the mouth of the Fraser River.

Friday’s decision is a disappointment to environmental groups that distrust B.C.’s LNG-promoting provincial government and had hoped federal environmental regulators would conduct their own review of the project.

Federal environment minister Leona Aglukkaq’s decision to allow B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Office to substitute for a federal review came a few days after a determination by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency that the WesPac project requires a federal assessment.

RELATED:Critics flag stricter U.S. rules on LNG tanker risks

The federal substitution order requires the province to assess environmental effects of marine shipping of LNG between the proposed jetty at Tilbury Island in Delta and Sand Heads at the entrance to the Strait of Georgia.

The review is also to include effects of malfunctions or accidents, cumulative environmental effects and potential mitigation measures.

The carriers loading at WesPac would go right past populated neighbouhoods in Ladner and Steveston – considerably closer than tankers expected to serve other proposed B.C. LNG terminals.

“B.C.’s now in charge of the process,” said Kevin Washbrook, with the group Voters Taking Action on Climate Change.

“It sounds like because of public pressure there’s a few more provisions than there would have been otherwise,” he said. “It’s a bit of a broader review, but it’s still only one review, not both.”

Senior governments say the substitution process – which has also been invoked for the proposed Woodfibre LNG plant near Squamish – avoids duplication and unnecessary cost.

The proposed $175-million WesPac docking facility would load supercooled LNG onto mid-sized tankers and barges for export from the adjacent FortisBC LNG plant, which is slated for a major $400-million expansion.

WesPac already has a licence from the National Energy Board to export 3.5 million tonnes of LNG per year and hopes to be in operation in 2018.

Ecotrust argues the vessels would add to cumulative risks for whales and fish habitat.

The 215-metre LNG carrier Portovenere is typical of the size of vessel that might carry liquefied natural gas from a proposed new jetty on the Fraser River in Delta. Contributed.

Just Posted

Flames drop to eighth in PJHL

Ridge loses two games over the weekend

Man known to frequent Maple Ridge wanted by Langley RCMP

An arrest warrant is out for Bryce Telford for allegedly impersonating a police officer

New Maple Ridge council has old problem: Albion flats

Staff asking for politicians to decide direction

Thomas Haney team builds tiny house

Students spend two years building tiny house during shop class

VIDEO: Here’s what the B.C. legislature officers are accused of buying

Personal trips, purchases, alcohol and more laid out in 76-page report by Plecas

Man pulls over to help injured owl, gets hit by SUV

Chase RCMP say owl flew away while they were on scene

Cannabis sales up 25% in November as overall retail sales fall 0.9%

Cannabis store sales totalled $54 million in the first full month of legal recreational pot sales

LNG Canada support far outweighs protests, CEO says

Andy Calitz vows completion on schedule at B.C. Natural Resource Forum

B.C. Green Party leader calls for Assistant Deputy Speaker to step aside

Weaver alleges whistleblower was fired after looking into the Liberal MLA’s expenses

B.C. man says he was evicted due to ‘personal vendetta’ against his toddler

Matt Astifan says he has tried to do what he can but a young child will always make some noise

Case of B.C. man caught with 27,500 fentanyl pills thrown out due to Charter breach

‘Ambiguous’ signal by drug sniffer dog Doodz leads to B.C. Supreme Court decision

B.C. animal killer Kayla Bourque guilty of breaching conditions

Bourque is expected to be sentenced on Feb. 8

Men allegedly tied to Red Scorpions gang arrested in B.C. drug busts

Nanaimo RCMP have made multiple arrests and seized drugs, weapons and cash

Most Read