(Wikimedia Commons)

Do you leave the heat or the TV on for your pet when you’re not home?

A BC Hydro poll says more than half of customers put their pet’s comfort above saving energy

It’s unlikely Fido understands the 6 p.m. news, but that hasn’t stopped the nearly 40 per cent of BC Hydro customers who admit to leaving the TV on for their pets when they’re not at home.

Nearly three quarters of customers say they leave lights, electronics or the heat on to keep their four-legged friends company while they’re away, according to a survey commissioned by BC Hydro and released Friday.

The utility said that could cost them up to $400 a year.

The most common items left on at least some of the time were the heat in the winter (90 per cent of respondents), the lights (86 per cent), and a fan (59 per cent).

Forty-seven per cent admitted to leaving the radio or music playing, while 39 per cent said they leave the TV on – whether that be to channels showing cartoons, the nature channel, music, news or sports. Almost 20 per cent said they’ve recorded a program specifically for their pet.

To cut down on the energy used to keep pets company, BC Hydro recommends lowering the thermostat by two degrees to save around five per cent in heating costs, switching to incandescent lightbulbs, and using smart light switches that can be controlled remotely from a smartphone.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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