Audrey De Oliveira and Debbie Dyer speak to media outside New Westminster Supreme Court after hearing testimony from Andelina Hecimovic.

Audrey De Oliveira and Debbie Dyer speak to media outside New Westminster Supreme Court after hearing testimony from Andelina Hecimovic.

Dyer family waits as driving death acquittal appealed

Did judge make error in ruling?

The waiting and agony continues for Debbie Dyer as the case against a woman who lost control of her car, killing Dyer’s daughter, winds its way through court.

Dyer recently spent another day in court, this time in B.C. Appeal Court, as three justices reviewed the acquittal of Andelina Kristina Hecimovic of dangerous driving in connection with the death of Beckie Dyer and Johnny De Oliveira four years ago.

“It was overwhelming to say the least,” said Debbie Dyer.

Rebecca ‘Beckie’ Dyer, 19, and her boyfriend, Johnny De Oliveira, 21, died around midnight Oct. 19, 2010. A Toyota driven by Hecimovic skidded sideways over a concrete median, flipped and landed on top of the couple’s Suzuki Swift.

Hecimovic was driving in the right-turn-only lane when she crossed the intersection of Harris Road and Lougheed Highway on a red light. An expert estimated she hit the concrete median at a speed of between 100 or 110 km/h.

Dyer said three justices of the B.C. Court of Appeal are deciding whether the judge made a legal error in the ruling last year. Justice Miriam Gropper ruled in the September 2013 trial that Hecimovic was not trying to beat the red light.

The judge found Hecimovic’s behaviour was not a “marked departure from the norm” as many people speed along that particular stretch of Lougheed Highway.

“It’s been four years. Now I have to wait again,” Dyer said.

She added that the court could make its decision, which either would uphold the original finding, enter a conviction or order a new trial, anytime between the next few weeks and the next six months.

“With all this happening … it doesn’t bring Johnathan and Beckie back.”

She pointed out that Beckie was awarded the Citizen of the Century award by the City of Pitt Meadows earlier this year. “She should have been there to receive this award, not me.

“It’s not just my loss. It’s everybody’s loss.”

Dyer said the loss of her daughter hit home when she attended a niece’s wedding and realized she won’t see her daughter walk down the aisle.

“I don’t celebrate anymore because there are two empty chairs there. I don’t even bother.”