George Coghlan

Candidates for Pitt Meadows mayor and council answer three questions for election.

  • Nov. 10, 2011 9:00 a.m.
George Coghlan

George Coghlan

Name: George Coghlan

Age: 62

Occupation: retired

Facebook:  George Coghlan (public figure)

1. What have you personally achieved, or what initiative have you personally led in recent years that qualifies you to be elected or re-elected as a Pitt Meadows councillor?

1. Before retiring, I worked as a manager for ICBC.  I have broad leadership experience, and with problem-solving, analysis, committee work, and development of policies and procedures. I also have much experience in team-building, and in liaison and negotiating.

On retiring to Pitt Meadows in 2006, I have volunteered as my strata corporation’s vice-president; as a member of my church committee; with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation; with the City of Pitt Meadows’ river enhancement project; and with the Pitt Meadows Day Society as volunteer coordinator,

Pitt Meadows Day parade principal organizer, and president.

2. How would you act on your top priorities as Pitt Meadows councillor/mayor?

2. First and foremost, a community depends for its quality of life on the involvement of its citizens. My top priority as councillor would be to encourage all residents of Pitt Meadows to take an active role in the life of our city, including making it easier to give input into the city’s business. I would also press for improved transit services, prudent management and reduction of our debt, for preservation of our agricultural base and for a careful approach to future spending in order to keep property taxes reasonable.

3. What is your position on the construction of the North Lougheed Connector and what kind of development should it serve?

3. This project will affect more than 50 hectares of ALR land. Since preservation of our agricultural land is dear to the hearts of most of us, substantial benefits must be shown in order to justify its removal, such as: major reduction in traffic congestion along the Lougheed Highway; high-quality hotel and conference facilities; an agriculturally-oriented component such as an agricultural teaching or demonstration facility; quality retail businesses. It should be accessible by transit. The financial costs and benefits of the project must be documented. As far as possible, it should pay for itself. Estimates of tax revenues, employment generated and the likely impact on existing businesses should be made public before a decision is made to proceed. Of the three development options presented to council, Option B will leave some farmland in the ALR, but is likely to generate enough income to pay for the connector.