A memorial to Hudson Brooks grew quickly outside the South Surrey RCMP detachment following his July 2015 death at the hands of police. (File photo)

A memorial to Hudson Brooks grew quickly outside the South Surrey RCMP detachment following his July 2015 death at the hands of police. (File photo)

IIO says recommendation out of inquest into 2015 Surrey homicide is already ‘current practice’

Proceedings examined officer-involved shooting death of Hudson Brooks

The Independent Investigations Office of BC (IIO) has responded to recommendations made this month by the jury at the coroner’s inquest into the 2015 officer-involved shooting death of Hudson Brooks in South Surrey.

READ MORE: Inquest yields ‘sliver of justice’ for South Surrey’s Hudson Brooks: brother

In short, IIO officials say the agency already complies with a recommendation directed its way, to “upon completion of their investigations, provide investigative materials and findings to the RCMP or other affected agency for the purpose of developing training solutions.”

“In accordance with the IIO’s current Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with BC police agencies, the IIO already provides copies of concluded investigation files to police agencies upon request, subject to applicable privacy laws and other related issues,” a news release issued Thursday (March 18) states.

“This disclosure is made for purposes of training, policy development, internal proceedings and other reasonable uses consistent with the enhancement of the ability of the police agency to carry out its duties.

“This provision has existed in some form since the IIO’s inception, and the IIO looks forward to continuing to find ways to contribute to positive learning opportunities in policing.”

Brooks died on July 18, 2015, after being shot multiple times during an altercation with police outside the South Surrey RCMP detachment, in the 1800-block of 152 Street.

Following investigation, charges were laid against the officer who shot him, Const. Elizabeth Cucheran, however, those charges were later dropped, after a review of information that arose during a preliminary inquiry determined the evidence no longer supported a criminal charge in the case.

The inquest – held March 1-4 in Burnaby – heard that Brooks had cocaine and alcohol in his system at the time, and had also ingested magic mushrooms in the hours prior.

Seventeen witnesses gave evidence.

The verdict included the classification of Brooks’ death as a homicide. Two other recommendations were for increased training for RCMP in the use of force, and that new technology for ‘intermediate force options’ be considered.



tholmes@peacearchnews.com
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