Canadian National Railway says petroleum coke spilled into a creek after a 27 cars of a freight train derailed northeast of Prince George Thursday, March 4, 2020. (Jennifer Goold/Facebook)

Liquefied petroleum gas was aboard recently derailed train in northern B.C.: TSB

Jonathan Abecassis of CN Rail says less than a carload of petroleum coke spilled into an adjacent creek

The Transportation Safety Board says seven rail cars that derailed in northern British Columbia last Thursday were filled with liquefied petroleum gas.

Board spokesman Alexandre Fournier says in an email that seven of the 28 derailed cars contained the gas, which is classified by the federal government as a flammable and dangerous commodity.

Fournier and Canadian National Railway say one car was carrying methanol and the other 20 cars were loaded with petroleum coke when they derailed in Giscome, B.C.

Jonathan Abecassis of CN Rail says less than a carload of petroleum coke spilled into an adjacent creek.

He says there was no danger to the public and no fire or injuries.

The local school district says Giscome Elementary was evacuated after the derailment due to uncertainty about the contents of the rail cars.

ALSO READ: Petroleum coke spilled into creek after CN Rail train derailed northeast of Prince George

The school, which is 200 metres from the rail line, remains closed and classes have been moved to a nearby elementary school.

Abecassis says petroleum coke is a non-hazardous byproduct of the refining process. All of the petroleum coke that spilled has been secured, he adds, and silt curtains and skirted booms were used after the derailment.

Fournier says the car carrying methanol derailed but remained upright.

The B.C. government’s environmental incident website says the transfer of liquid petroleum gas from the toppled rail cars began Sunday and is expected to last several days.

Trains are moving past the derailment site and environmental water quality monitoring in the nearby waterway is continuing, it says.

Fournier says the derailment is still being assessed by the Transportation Safety Board, which sent a team to the site.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CN Rail

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

School District 42 provides update on continued learning plan

Superintendent Sylvia Russell says staff will be in touch with Ridge Meadows students and families

LETTER: Upset by province’s stance against Lower Mainland hospice

Vocal Maple Ridge anti-MAiDs advocate opposes cancelling of contract with Delta facility

LETTER: Pandemic a little surreal for this guy

One day soon, COVID-19 will simply be a footnote: one Maple Ridge reader

GUEST VIEW: Media importance never more apparent than with COVID-19

In swan-song column, reporter Phil Melnychuk suggests more concerted PR early on might have helped

Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows MLA Lisa Beare announces $3 million in provincial funding for Arts and Culture

Eligible clients will receive supplement of up to $15,000 in early April to help pay bills

‘Tremendous’ response from blood donors has supply keeping pace with demand

About 400,000 of Canada’s 37 million residents give blood on a regular basis

Morning world update: Cases surge past 600,000; positive news in Germany

Spain suffers its deadliest day as Germany considers April 20 to possibly loosen restrictions

VIDEO: Penguins roam empty halls of Vancouver Aquarium

COVID-19 has forced the Vancouver Aquarium to close access to guests – leaving room for its residents

Significant snowfall forecast for Interior mountain passes

Allison Pass, the Okanagan Connector, Rogers Pass and Kootenay Pass could see 15 to 25 cm of snow

Kids get back to learning in B.C., online

Ministry of Education rolls out new tool for school

67 more B.C. COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Vancouver region

Positive tests found in Surrey, Langley long-term care facilities

‘Now is not the time to bag that peak’: BCSAR manager discourages risky outdoor adventures

Call volumes are not going down, even as the COVID-19 pandemic persists

Most Read