Man convicted of sexually assaulting girlfriend and recording nudity

Former Maple Ridge resident Glen Allen Berry also guilty of common assault.

A man was convicted last week for sexually assaulting his common-law partner and secretly recording her and another woman with a spy camera.

Since Glen Allen Berry did not contest two charges of sexual assault and three counts each of secretly observing and recording nudity in a private place, Madame Justice Heather Holmes found him guilty on all counts.

She also convicted him of common assault, the only charge he chose to fight in court.

During a sentencing hearing Friday, Crown prosecutor Janet Dickie moved to enter more videos filmed by Berry into evidence.

They included footage of his common law partner showering; photographs of a 14-year-old girl and a woman performing a sexual act; video of a six-year-old girl he filmed while showing her pornography; and video footage of children playing in which Berry focused on their buttocks.

Dickie told Justice Holmes the court needed to see the additional video to deliver an appropriate sentence, one that protects the public.

“Without this respective evidence, you are not in a position to fully understand the risk Mr. Berry poses to society,” she said.

Berry, 49, was arrested in September 2010 after his ex-girlfriend reported the common assault to police.

While investigating the assault, RCMP discovered several video recordings on Berry’s JVC camcorder and his Acer computer.

The camcorder and computer contained four videos that showed Berry sexually assaulting his ex-girlfriend while she slept.

The evidence that lead to the second voyeurism charge included footage of another young woman secretly filmed with a camera placed in the bathroom of Berry’s sister’s home during a family birthday party.

Berry has since moved out of Maple Ridge and now resides in Abbotsford.

Dickie told the court that Berry’s recent convictions are just a few examples of his “broader sexual deviance” and a dangerous pattern of conduct.

“These are not isolated incidents,” she added.

Justice Holmes has to determine whether the additional video can be entered as evidence during sentencing.

Berry’s lawyer, Adi Glouberman, objected to Crown’s submissions, saying the videos were irrelevant to the case at hand and prejudicial.

Justice Holmes is expected to rule on the admissibility of the videos before sentencing resumes in January.