(Contributed)                                South Alouette River is raging as release from Alouette Lake reservoir continues.

(Contributed) South Alouette River is raging as release from Alouette Lake reservoir continues.

Maple Ridge river still running high, but flood alert cancelled

Jerry Sulina Park closed briefly, then re-opened as water levels monitored

A flood alert for the South Alouette River, issued by B.C. Hydro last week, was cancelled within a day of being issued.

But the river is still being watched.

Last Wednesday, B.C. Hydro began a controlled release from the Alouette Lake reservoir into the South Alouette River in order to reduce lake levels that risen over four days as a result of heavy rains.

That alert, however, which warned people of possible flooding, was cancelled late Thursday, although the controlled release from the reservoir continues.

Releasing water is a common procedure used to regulate lake levels during the rainy season.

“The river will continue to run at a high rate from the controlled release and the additional rainfall that is forecast throughout the weekend,” the city said on its website.

The high water led to the off-leash dog area at Jerry Sulina Park, on 210th Street, being closed on the weekend. That re-opened on Monday, although people are still being advised to be careful around creeks and streams at this time.

The normal height of the water in the reservoir ranges from 112 metres to 125 metres. On Sunday, Nov. 26, the reservoir peaked at 124.46 metres, then dropped to 124.37 m on Monday.

Mora Scott, with Hydro, said that another storm is expected Tuesday, followed by a dry spell, which should help reduce the level.

“Once the reservoir is within a normal operating range for this time of year, we slowly reduce the spill from the dam. Based on our current forecasts, we are expecting to do this early next week,” Scott said.

“B.C. Hydro is continuing their controlled release from the Alouette Lake reservoir and all parties are keeping an eye on the weather and river levels,” said city spokesperson Fred Armstrong.