Metro Vancouver gives thanks to those who don’t put grease down the drain

Coming to a drain new you – fatberg – caused by putting fats, oils and grease clogging pipes.

As many sit down this weekend for the Thanksgiving feast, they may not realize they are contributing to a costly problem.

The average 14 pound turkey produced about 250 millilitres or 1 cup of fat.

Image that multiplied by thousands of homes in this community alone and it can create a problem down the line.

Metro Vancouver is one of the governments encouraging people to not pour fats, oils and grease (or FOG) down the drains. They mix with other items such as wipes and dental floss to create what’s called a fatberg.

As soon as the FOGs go a short distance, they start to harden and end up clogging the sewage system.

Metro Vancouver, after two successful pilots in Surrey and Richmond, is now rolling out a region-wide campaign in the lead up to Thanksgiving to educate residents about how to properly dispose of their kitchen oils and grease. With the ‘Wipe It, Green Bin It’ message, Metro Vancouver wants residents to put grease in their green bins, instead of down the sink.

“As we celebrate Thanksgiving with fat-rich foods like gravy and roast turkey, we hope residents will use this easy method to dispose of their oil and cooking fats,” says Darrell Mussatto, chair of Metro Vancouver’s Utilities Committee. “Simply wipe grease up with paper towel and place it in your green bin instead of pouring it down the drain.”

Metro Vancouver spends about $2 million to repair the damage caused by these products and homeowners can also face costly bills when their pipes get blocked. That’s why it created the Wipe It, Green Bin It campaign.

After two successful pilots in Surrey and Richmond, Metro Van is now rolling out a region-wide campaign in the lead up to Thanksgiving to educate residents about how to properly dispose of their kitchen oils and grease.

“It doesn’t matter how much hot water or soap you pour down after the grease, Mussatto noted. “Sooner or later it solidifies.”

Disposal:

• For small amounts of grease, wipe or scrape out the pot or pan and put the grease into your green bin.

• Larger amounts of grease, like deep fryer oil, can be dropped off at an approved recycling depot.

FIND A RECYCLING DEPOT THAT ACCEPTS FOGS

Kitchen cloggers:

• Fats – dairy produts, salad dressings, margarine, butter, shortening.

• Oils – cooking oils such as olive, canola, vegetable, corn, peanut, coconut) as well as oil-based sauces.

• Grease – pan drippings, trimmings from meat, lard.

READ ABOUT THANKSGIVING COOKING FIRE SAFETY

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Just Posted

UPDATED: Two seeking Liberal nod in Ridge, Mission

No dates yet for candidate selection process

Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows await Lyft, Uber

Licensing announcement expected next week

1.6-magnitude earthquake rouses residents from their sleep near Agassiz

The quake was detected 3 km east-northeast of Agassiz

Trauma talk packs the ACT in Maple Ridge

What is Trauma? is the second of three free community conversations

Hall Of Fame induction is a feather in the cap, says proud Walker Sr.

Son will be inducted into hall of fame with 76.6 percent of vote

Fashion Fridays: The basics you need for your body type

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

VIDEO: Mass coronavirus quarantines seen in China won’t happen in Canada, authorities say

‘If a case comes here, and it is probably … it will still be business as normal’

Owner surrenders dog suffering from days-old gunshot wound to B.C. SPCA

The dog was also found to be emaciated and suffering from a flea infestation

B.C. man dies after police called for ‘firearms injury’ in rural Alberta

Victim is 30-year-old Greater Victoria man, say police

VIDEO: Silvertips edge Giants 2-1 Thursday in Langley

Vancouver falls just short, dropping hard-fought, one-goal decision to Everett at home

Was Bigfoot just spotted on a Washington State webcam?

Sherman Pass is rougly 70 kilometres south of Grand Forks, B.C.

B.C. employer health tax wins ‘paperweight award’ for red tape

Businesses forced to estimate payroll, pay new tax quarterly

Most Read