B-Lines begin running late next year connecting Maple Ridge to Coquitlam Central SkyTrain station.

OUTLOOK: Maple Ridge wants to be ready for when the big B-Line begins

Study will try to match land use with transportation

  • Dec. 3, 2018 6:00 p.m.

In about a year from now, a big part of the grand plan for the heart of Maple Ridge should be in place.

Once the City of Maple Ridge completes its Lougheed Corridor Land Use Study and Metro Vancouver does the same for the entire Lougheed corridor from Coquitlam to Maple Ridge, the future of the big road that serves as the main artery for Maple Ridge should become clear.

Council, in September 2018, approved the start of the Lougheed Corridor Land Use Study to prepare for the arrival of B-Line buses in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows.

In about a year from now, the B-Line bus service will zoom customers from Haney Place Mall in downtown Maple Ridge to SkyTrain in Coquitlam Central station in about 40 minutes, at 10-minute frequencies, during rush hour.

The Lougheed Corridor Land Use Study will look at land uses along Lougheed, from 222nd Street to Maple Ridge’s western border, and include properties on the south side of the highway, as well as the north side of Dewdney Trunk Road and in between both roads.

The goal is to ensure that jobs, services, and housing are integrated with the future B-Line bus service, the city said when announcing the study.

It’s called a land-use study because the overall goal is decide how to use the land between Lougheed and Dewdney Trunk Road. The goal is to find a balance that will allow as much population density as possible along the route in order to support transit and businesses – while at the same time protecting Maple Ridge’s downtown, said Maple Ridge’s planning director Christine Carter.

Workshops, open houses and a community-wide survey will also help get the public’s ideas for the area. The study’s expected to have its recommendations ready by next summer.

“We’re going to have a chance to really look at it. What land-use makes the best sense – if you’ve got some of the B-Line stops out front,” Carter said.

Carter pointed out the study won’t change particular zones in the area but instead only will decide land use. If the land use or land designation in the official community plan is changed, people then later could apply to have zoning changed.

The B-Line buses will stop at Haney Place, Laity Street, 203rd Street, and Harris Road, in Pitt Meadows, with future stops possible at 222nd Street and Meadowtown mall, in Pitt Meadows proposed, but not available by opening in late 2019.

While the city does its study, it will also take part in Metro Vancouver’s Lougheed Corridor Land Use and Monitoring Study that also involves Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam and Coquitlam. That will also form part of the city’s own review.

“The issue has always been, how much density do we allow along that corridor – because we don’t want to detract from the success of the downtown,” Carter said.

“We want to continue to support the town centre. I just think it’s [downtown] on a real, positive course.”

An economist will help sketch out the effects of planning changes on the town centre, just to make sure that’s not accidently affected.

“There are some really nice developments coming to the town centre and we want to support them and we don’t want to make and changes along Lougheed that would detract from the success of the downtown.”

What planning staff don’t want to encourage is for businesses to locate outside the downtown and weaken a growing town centre.

Planning also must ensure there are places for B-Line buses to pull into, to spare backing up the highway. Those spaces are currently in TransLink’s design process.

“We envision it will all come together.”

Carter said that the land-use study will also create a foundation for a later and larger Lougheed area plan, which will set out in detail how the Lougheed Highway corridor will develop.

The land-use study should also ensure that there’s enough right of way for transit. Several years ago, the city also identified Lougheed Highway as the route for a future SkyTrain connection to the downtown.

Former mayor Nicole Read wanted the extension of SkyTrain into Maple Ridge to be adopted into TransLink’s long-term plans.

Former Pitt Meadows mayor John Becker said the intent is to ensure enough land is set aside along the Lougheed corridor for rapid transit at some point in the future. The review of Pitt Meadows’s official community plan now underway will also consider the transportation studies.

The city has put a hold on any development applications on that stretch of Lougheed until the study is complete.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

NDP headquarters on election night, Oct. 24, 2020. (Katya Slepian/Black Press Media)
ELECTION 2020: Live blog from B.C. party headquarters

BC NDP projected to win majority government – but celebrations will look different this election

B.C. Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau outlines her party's climate action platform at Nanaimo's Vancouver Island Conference Centre earlier this month. (News Bulletin file photo)
Green leader Furstenau declared victor in her home riding on Vancouver Island

Cowichan Valley voters elect freshly minted party leader for her second term

John Horgan has been re-elected the MLA for Langford-Juan de Fuca. (File-Black Press)
Horgan trounces challengers to be re-elected in his Vancouver Island riding

MLA has represented constituency of Langford-Juan de Fuca and its predecessors since 2005

During a scenic, but chilling ride on a sunny Saturday, Oct. 24 Ron Paley captured photos of the nearby mountains lightly covered with snow. (Special to The News)
SHARE: 26km bike ride nets mix of fall colours

Send us your photo showing how you view Maple Ridge or Pitt Meadows, and it could be featured soon

(Image by Ulrike Leone from Pixabay)
QUIZ: A celebration of colour

Fall in British Columbia is a time to enjoy a spectrum of vivid colours

The Canadian border is pictured at the Peace Arch Canada/USA border crossing in Surrey, B.C. Friday, March 20, 2020. More than 4.6 million people have arrived in Canada since the border closed last March and fewer than one-quarter of them were ordered to quarantine while the rest were deemed “essential” and exempted from quarantining. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Majority of international travellers since March deemed ‘essential’, avoid quarantine

As of Oct. 20, 3.5 million travellers had been deemed essential, and another 1.1 million were considered non-essential

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam responds to a question during a news conference Friday October 23, 2020 in Ottawa. Canada’s top physician says she fears the number of COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths may increase in the coming weeks as the second wave continues to drive the death toll toward 10,000. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s top doctor warns severe illness likely to rise, trailing spike in COVID-19 cases

Average daily deaths from virus reached 23 over the past seven days, up from six deaths six weeks ago

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

BC Hydro map showing where power has been knocked out is dotted with over a dozen outages. (BC Hydro map screenshot)
Thousands without power in Lower Mainland on election day

One outage in Langley and Surrey is affecting over 4,000 customers

file
One dead after fiery crash near Agassiz

Agassiz RCMP report a 56-year-old man died Friday night

The possibility of the Canadian Premier League expanding to the Fraser Valley has been floated online. (Facebook photo)
Canadian Premier League possibly eyeing Fraser Valley expansion

Soccer league looking to add ninth team to the mix, B.C. markets potentially rumoured

Most Read