Roosters to pay for bouncer’s assault

Judge awards Jacob Reimer $20,000 in punitive damages

  • Dec. 6, 2013 7:00 a.m.

A man badly beaten by bouncers for trying to sneak a beer into a Pitt Meadows bar has been awarded more than $20,000 by a court.

B.C. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jenkins found Rooster’s Country Cabaret “vicariously liable for the negligence of their staff” who assaulted Jacob Aidan Reimer four years ago.

“The assault in the parking lot was unprovoked and the entire episode should have ended with Mr. Reimer … walking out through the parking lot,” Justice Jenkins said in a ruling Tuesday.

“It is also particularly objectionable that the beating was carried out in front of several of the patrons of Rooster’s who …were exposed to incredible brutality.”

The incident took place on Sept. 13, 2009, when an intoxicated Reimer tried to enter the country bar with three friends and a can of beer in his cargo shorts.

After staff refused to let Reimer into the bar, he became aggressive and was “physically removed” by two bouncers.

Reimer and his friend, Ryan Murchie, walked to the parking lot to wait for their friends to leave Roosters.

Moments later, however, he was attacked by a bouncer Sam Turnau as other staff stood by and watched.

The beating left Reimer with head injuries including a concussion, a cut to his right eyebrow, a swollen right eye, swelling and contusions on his right temple and bruises on his neck and ear. He also lost a tooth.

Justice Jenkins characterized the beating as a “slugfest”.

The judge said it was unnecessary, totally unacceptable “high-handed, malicious, arbitrary and reprehensible.”

Turnau was much larger than Reimer and described at the trial as “huge.”

The judge noted it took Reimer at least four weeks before he could play rugby again, adding that the defendants in the case are most fortunate that Reimer did not suffer more serious injuries considering the extent of the assault.

“I find that Mr. Turnau and others among the Rooster’s security personnel on the night in question used force far in excess of what would have been required or reasonable to subdue Mr. Reimer and they deliberately set out to inflict serious harm on Mr. Reimer,” the judge said.

Turnau was charged with assault causing bodily harm, but acquitted at  trial. Reimer then sued Rooster’s and its staff in civil court.

Justice Jenkins awarded Reimer $3,000 in aggravated damages and $20,000 in punitive damages.

• Read the full ruling online.

 

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