Seizures of U.S. guns double

Increase in firearms surrendered as visitors enter Canada.

  • Aug. 26, 2016 4:00 p.m.
U.S. firearms were seized by CBSA at border crossings.

U.S. firearms were seized by CBSA at border crossings.

Canadian Border Services Agency has seen a 116-per-cent increase in the number of firearms seized in the Pacific Region in the first half of 2016.

With a 10-per-cent increase also recorded in the Prairie region, the CBSA is working with U.S. officials on a firearms awareness campaign to remind Americans about restrictions on bringing guns into Canada.

“Attempting to smuggle firearms across the border can result in immediate forfeiture, hefty fines and even significant jail time,” said Kim Scoville, CBSA’s regional director general for the Prairie region.

Visitors entering the border inspection line should declare any firearms at their first opportunity.

Border services officers will take possession of the weapon if it is declared, but the visitor has the option of shipping it back under CBSA supervision or surrendering it without prosecution.

 

Lumber exports shifting to U.S.

 

Wood products exports from Canada to Asia were down 18 per cent in the first six months of 2016, with the biggest decline being softwood lumber from B.C. to China, according to the Seattle-based Wood Resources International.

Lumber sales to China are on pace to drop by 50 per cent this year compared to 2014, as B.C. lumber producers direct their sales to a healthy U.S. lumber market, according to customs data tracked for the Wood Resources Quarterly (woodprices.com).

The latest edition notes that by value, 75 per cent of B.C.’s exports to Asia in 2015 and 2016 are in the form of lumber, while 77 per cent of exports from Washington and Oregon are logs.

Asian demand reached a record high in 2013, with China passing Japan as the largest importer of North American wood products in 2011.

 

Seniors’ survey seeks volunteers

 

More than 250 volunteers have signed up to compile a survey of seniors in residential care, and B.C.’s Seniors Advocate is looking for more.

The 27,000 seniors living in 300 residential care facilities around the province are being asked about their experience with care home staff, the quality of food, privacy, medications and other conditions.

It’s the first comprehensive survey done in B.C. to measure resident satisfaction and provide a “road map” for improvements, said Seniors Advocate Isobel Mackenzie.

Interviews will be conducted in person by trained volunteers, and a matching mail-out survey will be sent to each resident’s most frequent visitor.

The project is seeking volunteers with a range of professional backgrounds, ages and ethnicities. To apply as a volunteer, visit, surveybcseniors.org or call the Office of the Seniors Advocate at 1-877-952-3181.