Surrey resident Emmanuel Alviar captured on video pushing against a car on the night of the June 15

Surrey resident Emmanuel Alviar captured on video pushing against a car on the night of the June 15

Sentence a sign prison coming for most convicted rioters

First-time offender from Surrey jailed for role in Cup riot

A one-month jail term handed to a 20-year-old Surrey man for his role in last year’s Stanley Cup riot is bad news for the dozens of others still awaiting their day in court and hoping to avoid prison.

Emmanuel Alviar pleaded guilty this spring to charges of mischief and participating in a riot, saying he was sorry for helping stir up mayhem downtown last June 15 after the Vancouver Canucks lost the Cup to the Boston Bruins.

It’s the first sentence for a Cup rioter with no prior criminal record and it’s being interpreted as a sign jail terms will be unescapable for most who follow.

Alviar, a drywaller and former choir singer, turned himself in to police early in the investigation after videos circulated online showing him pushing against a car that other rioters then destroyed, and later throwing a barricade at a window.

Provincial Court Judge Reg Harris took into account his remorse and guilty plea, but said the size, duration and damage done by the riot – as well as the fact it was the second one in Vancouver involving a hockey crowd – required a substantial deterrent.

Harris also gave Alviar 16 months probation, 150 hours of community service and ordered him to write apology letters to Vancouver’s mayor and chief of police.

Alviar’s lawyer said the sentence sets a probable floor of jail time for similar first-time offenders and all but rules out conditional sentences, which he had asked for on behalf of his client.

SFU criminologist Rob Gordon agreed.

“I think it’s more likely than not,” he said of jail for the rest. “It depends on who they are and what they’ve been doing in the past.”

The only other rioter sentenced so far was Coquitlam resident Ryan Dickinson, who got 17 months in jail less three and a half months credit for time served, but he had a past record of assault.

Gordon noted some of Alviar’s behaviour worked against him – he was seen at three different places during the riot over a period of hours when he was supposed to have been chaperoning four 14-year-olds.

But he said other accused rioters who didn’t come forward early face long odds of avoiding jail.

“Those who did not put their hands up, those police had to chase, and those with prior convictions will be facing longer periods,” he predicted. “I think a lot of people will be satisfied.”

Gordon said it sends a clear message to future rioters.

Technically, he added, the one-month sentence is “fairly gentle” in light of the fact a conviction for participating in a riot can result in a prison term of years.

Charges expected against more than 300

Crown prosecutors have charged 104 accused rioters so far and police are seeking charges against at least 120 more.

The largest number charged so far – 44 – are from Surrey, followed by 38 from Vancouver, 27 from Burnaby, 19 from Richmond, 14 from North Vancouver, 11 from Delta, eight in Langley and seven each in Abbotsford and Maple Ridge.

“By the time we are done, we expect that we will exceed 300 persons charged with over 900 criminal charges,” Vancouver Police Chief Jim Chu said.

“We believe this is the greatest number of people charged with a crime arising from one incident in Canadian history.”

Chu called for public help in identifying 10 worst unidentified rioters through photos posted on the riot investigation website at riot2011.vpd.ca.

He said 14 of 15 rioters who attacked a Good Samaritan have now been identified and either face charges or remain under investigation.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

In a 2019 photograph, Yin Yin Din held a picture of her brother Kyaw Naing Din, 54, and her late father Hla Din who passed away in 2014, during a trip to Victoria. (The News files)
Family of Maple Ridge man killed by cop appeals to Attorney General for help

The Din family want B.C. Attorney General David Eby to forward their case to Crown

Maple Ridge's Doug Ubell caught some photographs recently that he was anxious to share, one taken while on the Trans-Canada Trail looking southwest towards the Pitt River Bridge, and another from on Golden Ears Bridge. (Special to The News)
Traffic on Golden Ears Bridge returning to pre-pandemic levels

Commuters from Langley, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge still driving more, taking transit less

A sign to students outside Pitt Meadows secondary. The school is not currently listed by Fraser Health as having COVID-19 exposures. (Neil Corbett/The News)
Four more Maple Ridge/Pitt Meadows schools exposed to COVID-19

Cases at three public schools and Maple Ridge Christian

Born and raised in Maple Ridge, Ernie Daykin is still astonished at this community’s beauty. He recently captured this image of the snow covered peaks of the Golden Ears in the background, and cherry blossoms in the foreground. (Special to The News)
SHARE: View of Golden Ears from many different perspectives

Send us your photo showing how you view Maple Ridge or Pitt Meadows, and it could be featured soon.

Spray paint was discovered at Hot Rocks. (Special to The News)
Popular Maple Ridge summer destination vandalized

Rocks discovered with spray paint along South Alouette

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS
B.C. sees 873 more COVID-19 cases Tuesday, decline continues

Hospitalizations up to 377, two more deaths for 1,515 total

B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
Tougher COVID-19 restrictions in B.C., including travel, still ‘on the table’: Horgan

John Horgan says travel restrictions will be discussed Wednesday by the provincial cabinet

Protesters occupied a road leading to Fairy Creek Watershed near Port Renfrew. (Submitted photo)
B.C. First Nation says logging activist interference not welcome at Fairy Creek

Vancouver Island’s Pacheedaht concerned about increasing polarization over forestry activities

Flow Academy is not accepting membership applications from anybody who has received a dose of the vaccine, according to a password-protected membership application form. (Submitted image)
B.C. martial arts gym refusing patrons who have been vaccinated, wear masks

Interior Health has already issued a ticket to Flow Academy for non-compliance with public health orders

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Of 46 arrests made between March 16 and 19 at Metrotown mall in Burnaby, 27 suspected shoplifters are now facing charges. (Twitter/Burnaby RCMP)
RCMP arrest 46 people in 4 days during Metrotown shoplifting crackdown

$4,800 in stolen merchandise was recovered and returned to businesses inside of the mall

Kao Macaulay has been charged in relation to a home break-in on March 30 in Abbotsford in which five kittens were stolen. (Facebook photo)
‘Prolific offender’ charged with theft of 5 newborn kittens in Abbotsford

Kao Macaulay, 23, is accused of breaking into home on March 30

Sheila Malcolmson, B.C.’s minister of mental health and addictions (Screen shot)
Minister of mental health tells Surrey audience COVID-19 ‘has made everything worse’

More than 23,000 people in B.C. are receiving medication to treat opioid addiction

Facebook screenshot of the sea lion on Holberg Road. (Greg Clarke Facebook video)
VIDEO: Sea lion randomly spotted on remote B.C. logging road

Greg Clarke was driving home on the Holberg Road April 12, when he saw a large sea lion.

Most Read