Bruce McArthur is shown in a Facebook photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Facebook)

‘Significant development’ expected in Bruce McArthur’s case: police

The alleged serial killer has a court hearing scheduled for Tuesday

A “significant development” is expected in the case of an alleged serial killer accused of preying on men who disappeared from Toronto’s gay village, police said Monday.

Bruce McArthur, 67, faces eight counts of first-degree murder and has a court hearing scheduled for Tuesday morning.

Toronto police made note of the upcoming hearing in a statement issued Monday afternoon.

“A significant development in this case is expected,” the force said, declining to comment further.

Late last year, McArthur waived his right to a preliminary hearing, opting to go straight to a trial that has been scheduled for January 2020.

READ MORE: Alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur waives right to preliminary hearing

Toronto police arrested the self-employed landscaper in January 2018.

He was eventually charged with eight counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Selim Esen, Andrew Kinsman, Majeed Kayhan, Dean Lisowick, Soroush Mahmudi, Skandaraj Navaratnam, Abdulbasir Faizi, and Kirushna Kanagaratnam.

The men went missing from the gay village between 2010 and 2017. The city’s LGBTQ community had long said a killer was preying on men who vanished from the area.

Police said they recovered the remains of seven men in large planters at a residential property in midtown Toronto where McArthur worked while the remains of an eighth man was found in a nearby ravine.

READ MORE: Remains of all eight Bruce McArthur victims now identified, Toronto police say

Lead detective Insp. Hank Idsinga has said the McArthur investigation marked the largest forensic examination in the force’s history.

Forensic officers scoured McArthur’s apartment for four months, moving centimetre by centimetre through the residence with the belief it was an alleged murder scene. They seized 1,800 exhibits and snapped more than 18,000 photographs of the scene.

READ MORE: ‘Items of interest’ found at home linked to accused killer Bruce McArthur

Police also spent months combing the property where the remains were found and also sent cadaver dogs to more than 100 properties linked to McArthur.

The force’s cold case squad is currently investigating a series of homicides in the 1970s related to men with ties to the gay village, but Idsinga has said they’ve found nothing to link those to McArthur.

Liam Casey, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

UPDATE: Plane flips over at Pitt Meadows airport

Runway closed for an undetermined length of time.

UPDATE: Names keep adding to vaccine petition

Maple Ridge mom started campaign to make vaccination a condition of attending school

Pets: Decrease in surplus, homeless animals

New five-year plan for SPCA.

Trudeau’s principal secretary, Gerald Butts, resigns amid SNC-Lavalin furor

Butts categorically denies the accusation that he or anyone else in the PMO improperly pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould

VIDEO: Winterhawks end Giants winning streak at seven

Playing on home ice, Vancouver’s G-Men fell 5-3 during a Family Day game against Portland.

Aaron Pritchett and George Canyon to headline Gone Country concert in Cloverdale this summer

‘Early bird tickets on sale via Twins Cancer Fundraising website

Lost a ring? This B.C. man will find it for you

Chris Turner founded The Ring Finders, an international directory of metal detector hobbyists

Poverty coalition has high hopes for B.C. poverty reduction strategy

Funding allocation expected to be released with 2019 budget

‘How did we get here?’: B.C. mom of transplant recipient worries about measles outbreaks

Addison, 7, cannot get a live vaccine because she has a heart transplant

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh calls for public inquiry over SNC-Lavalin questions

Vancouver member of Parliament Jody Wilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet last week

Canadian airlines waiting for guidance from Ottawa over X gender option

Major U.S. airlines said they will change their process so passengers can identify themselves along non-binary lines

Moose Hide campaign takes message to Canadian schools

Campaign launches new K-12 education platform

Most Read