Tighter lawn sprinkling restrictions over the past four years have been credited for improved water conservation in Metro Vancouver.

Snow shortage unlikely to dry up Metro Vancouver water reservoirs

Water conservation beating regional district's targets, expected to help ensure supply in low-runoff summer

Metro Vancouver’s water reservoirs are nearly full and the regional district expects no water supply problems despite extremely low snowpacks.

The lowest level is at Seymour Lake, which is 87 per cent full, but it and other reservoirs are expected to be topped up with rains in early May, according to a Metro staff report.

Snowpacks levels near upper reservoirs are at less than 10 per cent of the long-term average so runoff to refill reservoirs this summer will be much less than normal, the report said.

But conservation is working in the regional district’s favour.

Tighter morning-only lawn sprinkling regulations imposed over the past four years has pushed average daily water use in the region down by about 10 per cent since 2010 – better than a regional target of five per cent or one per cent each year.

A similar drop in water use has been measured on the “peak day” of each year, typically the hottest, driest day of the summer.

Overall, Metro residents are using 27 per cent less water per capita than they were in 1993, the report said.

Water stored in the reservoirs and alpine lakes that Metro can tap should be adequate, the report said, noting water use limits can be tightened further in the event of extreme drought or unusually high demand.

Regular lawn sprinkling restrictions take effect June 1.

Residential sprinkling is allowed from 4 to 9 a.m. only on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday for even-numbered addresses and Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday for odd-numbered addresses.

Metro Vancouver chart showing decline of per capita water use in the region over time.

 

Just Posted

‘The Fonz’ gives thumbs up in letter to dyslexic students at Maple Ridge school

Students at James Cameron School reached out to Henry Winkler after reading one his Zipster books.

Scorpion, first brought to Maple Ridge vet, gives birth after hitching ride in woman’s luggage

A Vancouver woman inadvertently brought the animal home from a trip to Cuba

Maple Ridge man faces deportation over father’s honour-killing conviction

Father lied to immigration, was later acquitted of charges in Jassi Sidhu’s murder

LETTER: The good and bad at Ridge Meadows Hospital

‘I drove to the hospital and paid $6.50 for parking.’

UPDATE: Police incident at west Maple Ridge mall

Save-On-Foods closed due to threat, police say

Scorpion, first brought to Maple Ridge vet, gives birth after hitching ride in woman’s luggage

A Vancouver woman inadvertently brought the animal home from a trip to Cuba

Students disciplined after anti-LGBTQ signs posted in Kamloops high school

Vessy Mochikas, SD73’s principal for inclusive education, called incident a learning opportunity

Air Canada expects Boeing 737 Max to resume flying by September or October

Air Canada isn’t worried about safety of the planes, says vice-president

B.C. teen killed by falling tree near Victoria

Second youth also injured in freak incident during field trip at Camp Barnard near Sooke

Commercial fishers in B.C. now required to wear life-jackets on deck: WorkSafeBC

WorkSafeBC reports 24 work-related deaths in the commercial fishing industry between 2007 and 2018

Rossland boy finds human kindness sweet as honey after beehive destroyed

Family overwhelmed by kind offerings of strangers all across B.C.

B.C. files second legal challenge against Alberta over turn-off-taps law

B.C. government filed a second lawsuit against Alberta on June 14

Tax credits, penalizing big polluters, key to Conservative climate plan

Canada’s commitment is to cut emissions to 70 per cent of what they were in 2005 before 2030

PHOTOS: MP Mark Warawa loses brief battle with cancer

The Conservative Member of Parliament and long-time community advocate died in hospice this morning

Most Read