Editorial: Some sense

Advances in technology can put lawmakers in serious catch-up mode, such as the case with drones.

Advances in technology can put lawmakers in serious catch-up mode, such as the case with drones.

Some cities have developed bylaws regarding drones.

And Transport Canada will presumably provide small municipalities who can’t develop meaningful legislation on this issue with some teeth when it comes out with new regulations on unmanned aircraft next year.

Another advance in technology – the proliferation of cell phones – has proven deadly in B.C., where one quarter of traffic fatalities can be attributed to distracted driving.

Ten years ago, distracted driving meant eating or turning around to help a child in the back seat.

Legislation is in place, and enforcement campaigns frequent, in regards to distracted driving in B.C.

But before drones, before cell phones, before electricity, there was something called common sense.

Most would know it’s not OK to buzz a drone over a group of people doing yoga, The same for texting while driving.

Such is the state of our world that laws must be put in place because many humans have lost any tenuous grip they once had on common sense.

It seems the speed of technological advances in our society is only matched by the backwards slide in our ability to use our brains.

– Black Press