Oil pipelines put money in our pockets

If we did not sell any fossil fuels, we would be a have not province many times over

Editor, The News:

Re: Protest to defend climate (The News, 20 Nov. 2013)

It seems to be in fashion to protest pipeline construction.  Most people seemed to be opposed without really understanding why.

Protesting pipeline construction with signs saying things like it is destroying communities.  How does anything that increases wealth by creating jobs destroy a community?  Does putting money into a community destroy a community?

Some protestors seem to feel that the use of fossil fuels is not good. We use fossil fuels because they are cheap and easy to access.  Other countries give us money for them which allows us to have money to pay for the many social services that we enjoy.   If we did not sell any fossil fuels, we would be a have not province many times over.

Countries that buy our fossil fuels like the US would, if not available, be buying them from the Middle East at a higher risk to the environment.  If fossil fuels are not used, more expensive fuel systems would be used which would cost us more for all products we buy.  Are these protestors OK with a 10 or 20 per cent increase in food and other goods?

If the protestors are concerned about the remote chance of a spill, they should be demanding better prevention not stopping construction.  All spills that have happened in past are from older pipes that were build with little concern of environment or by governments with little concern.

Demand or protest for higher construction controls not stopping something that puts money in yours and everyone else’s pocket.

Others seem to protest on rational the use of fossil fuels create global warming.  Fossil fuels is one of many things impacting global warming.  Coal burning is biggest cause and making oil available will decrease dependence on coal use.  The biggest impact on global warming is really the over population of the world—not the products they use.

It is nice to live in a fantasy world of magic where everything is provided with no thought to cost.  Some protestors need to just grow up and join the real world.

Dan Banov

Maple Ridge

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