The cycle of poverty continues

Almost every family has at least one family member who is affected by some form of addiction or mental health issue, including mine.

Editor, The News:

Re: Problem gamblers hit hard (The News, Oct. 18).

Thank-you for highlighting and running this important article for our weekend community paper.

This subject hits very hard for some families.

How problematic is it? Almost every family has at least one family member who is affected by some form of addiction or mental health issue, including mine.

This casino could not have been placed in a more dire location.

Located just one block from the local welfare office and two blocks from the mental heath office and Salvation Army, where our most vulnerable population go on a regular basis.

The public’s opinion to Maple Ridge council seemed to have gone unheeded. It seems that Maple Ridge council has an agenda all their own.

If council is so gung-ho in putting in a casino, at least put it on River Road, or a location where one with money to spare can drive to their destination.

The population I’m referring to has limited capacity for the result of consequences, but live mostly in the moment.

One can be sure that this vulnerable population, with monthly check in hand, will be lured to walking up the street to try and make some quick money.  These people, who have so little to begin with, will have even less – or nothing after a few minutes in our new, luxury gaming centre in Maple Ridge.

The mentality ill  or addicted person will have to wait another month before he or she receives any more money for essentials, or will theft and crime increase to compensate for a lack of funds?

Or the cycle continues.

Claudia Finamore

Maple Ridge

 

Self-discipline

Editor, The News:

Re: Problem gamblers hit hard (The News, Oct. 18).

I play the slots only about once every three years, but I can empathize with those who find the games so alluring.

One change I have noticed, that might have some bearing on the overspending, is that casinos have gone from paying off with a waterfall of nickels and dimes to issuing paper invoices. I feel that this change has the psychological effect of causing the players to spend more money.

Formerly, when the cash came tumbling into the tray, it was natural to pocket some of it, then use the remainder for more play.

Now, I have to discipline myself to cash in this receipt-– it is more natural to just keep playing until all the winnings have vanished.

I would venture that other gamers are the same, and rather than returning home with a pocketful of change, they are empty-handed.

Families suffer from having a member who is a gambling addict, and anything that can make the pastime fun rather than a compulsive behaviour, should be implemented.

Patricia Palomino

Maple Ridge