Painting a fifth season of rain

Maple Ridge artist Linzy Arnott gives spring, summer,
fall and winter a decidedly wet look

Linzy Arnott completes a painting titled Flooded.

Linzy Arnott completes a painting titled Flooded.

Linzy Arnott wants to show you The Five Seasons.Anyone familiar with a basic wall calendar might immediately notice something amiss in that statement, but the young Maple Ridge artist insists that there is, in fact, another season — one that doesn’t begin or end based on the tilt of the Earth.“The fifth season is rain,” says the newest member of the Fort Gallery artists collective. “It encompasses all the four seasons in Vancouver.”And all of Arnott’s 32 paintings, which went on display in the Fort Langley gallery on Feb. 16, incorporate the so-called fifth season, giving spring, summer, fall and winter a decidedly wet look.To get her theme across to the viewer, Arnott used a fairly specific technique.“Some are painted entirely in dripped paint,” she said. Others, meanwhile, incorporate drips along with more traditional brush techniques.“I work in acrylics — large scale abstracts, on canvas and wood,” Arnott said.“Even though I love to paint abstract, birds often find their way into my work. To me, birds are the most beautiful symbol of freedom and I hope to convey that through my work, freedom to follow your passions and dreams and to find the beauty in every day life,” said Arnott.“Painting is so freeing for me. I am not good with words, but I can just pour my entire soul out onto canvas to express myself better than words ever could.”Arnott’s art is driven by her life experiences and the details found in her surroundings.“The gorgeous scenery of the Fraser Valley and Vancouver is a huge inspiration. My work is very emotion-driven, with the intent to capture a feeling visually.”This is just the 24-year-old’s third exhibit and her first with the Fort artists collective. Previously, she has had shows in Duncan (where she grew up) and in Coquitlam.Of the 50 paintings she displayed on the Island, all but five sold. It was an exciting milestone for the young artist.Another was being accepted to the Fort Gallery cooperative.“I applied four times, and finally got in,” she said.“It’s an amazing group and I know I’m going to be able to learn a lot from them.”In the few short months she’s belonged to the gallery, she’s appreciated being able to talk to the other artists — all professionals in the field — and gather ideas.And because it is an artists’ cooperative gallery, Arnott was able to oversee every aspect of her exhibit.“It’s the first time I’ve had total control over where and how to display my work,” she said.Now a full-time artist, Arnott studied design on a full scholarship at the Art Institute of Vancouver and took a semester at Emily Carr.But she knew long before that, this is what she wanted to do with her life.“It has been my dream to be an artist since I could hold a pencil,” she said.At 16, she was represented B.C. in a nationwide art contest and was flown to Quebec to see her work displayed in the Canadian Children’s Museum.Arnott’s work is now represented in galleries in Vancouver, Alberta and New York City and she is also a brand new active status member of the Federation of Canadian Artists.And last Wednesday, she learned she’d won the first annual Good Life Connoisseur Art Contest. The 23 semi-finalists’ art was auctioned off, with all proceeds going to Operation Rainbow Canada.