Humboldt Broncos will continue to accept donations after GoFundMe closes

130,000 individuals, businesses from Canada and beyond donated $20 to $50,000 to GoFundMe campaign

The GoFundMe page dedicated to the Humboldt Broncos, believed to be the largest of its kind in Canadian history, will remain open for two more days before being transferred to a newly created memorial fund, the team’s officials announced Monday. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

The GoFundMe page dedicated to the Humboldt Broncos, believed to be the largest of its kind in Canadian history, will remain open for two more days before being transferred to a newly created memorial fund, the team’s officials announced Monday.

More than 130,000 individuals and businesses from Canada and other countries have donated between $20 and $50,000 to the GoFundMe campaign, called Funds for Humboldt Broncos. The campaign was started by Humboldt resident Sylvie Kellington after the horrific bus crash earlier this month, which killed 16 players and staff. In nine days, the online campaign has raised more than $12 million.

Humboldt Broncos president Kevin Garinger announced at a news conference in Saskatoon that the campaign will remain open until midnight Wednesday, at which point all funds will be transferred to the new Humboldt Broncos Memorial Fund. The $12 million raised will serve its intended purpose of paying for expenses of the victims’ families, Garinger said, adding that it’s too soon to give a more specific breakdown of the way the funds will be allocated.

“Sylvie was hoping to raise $5,000 to maybe buy coffee and support maybe parking, and that sort of thing, to help families,” he said. “It of course grew much larger than that.”

Garinger also said the team will continue to accept donations through another new organization, the Humboldt Strong Community Foundation, which he said will ”support Humboldt Broncos players, employees, families and volunteers, as well as first responders and emergency services personnel, teams, athletes, related organizations and communities affected by the crash.”

The creation of the new foundation will clear up any existing confusion about which memorial items are considered to be sanctioned by the team. From now on, only initiatives that direct their proceeds to the Humboldt Strong Community Foundation will be considered officially endorsed by the Broncos as an organization, Garinger said.

“The Broncos cannot and will not be able to verify the legitimacy of any other event, or the dispersal of funds raised by any other such events,” he said.

In recent days, concerns have been mounting about the sale of unauthorized merchandise that uses the team’s name, logo, or the slogan “Humboldt Strong” without donating any of the funds to the victims or their families.

It’s common for people to want to buy items that will allow them to show their support after a tragic event, says Timothy Dewhirst, a marketing and consumer studies professor at the University of Guelph.

READ MORE: More than 3,000 attend Humboldt Broncos hockey player funeral

READ MORE: Brother remembers Broncos hockey player as humble, honest, hard-working

“There’s often, after a tragedy like this, different displays of support and solidarity that we might see,” he said. ”We’ve seen a lot of people displaying green ribbons and displaying hockey sticks at their front door.”

But the potential problem with unauthorized merchandise is that consumers may assume that any sale connected to an event like the bus crash includes a donation, when not all of them do.

Online retailers like Redbubble, which allow users to upload their own designs and pays them a portion of the profits, offer dozens of T-shirt designs featuring Humboldt-related logos, as well as cellphone cases, mugs, tote bags, and more, but the products don’t mention donations of any kind. Redbubble did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Other websites like Teepublic and Teezily, which also allow users to upload their own work, similarly offer many Humboldt Broncos products, most of which don’t mention a donation, although some products do link to the GoFundMe page.

In cases like this, the responsibility is shared between the retailer and the consumer, Dewhirst says.

The choice to sell products that reference the bus crash but don’t benefit any of the victims “certainly doesn’t appear very ethical,” he says. “Many (people) would have a moral stance on trying to capitalize financially on a tragedy.”

Dewhirst also suggests consumers research charitable products before purchasing them. If proceeds are “largely being used in terms of administration and logistics, rather than actually going to the people in need, that would be a disappointing use of the money,” he says.

Merchandise doesn’t necessarily have to be officially authorized by the team to provide a charitable function. Some companies like Gongshow Gear and Sauce Hockey are advertising that 100 per cent of the proceeds of the Humbolt-themed shirts they sell will go to the Bronco’s GoFundMe page.

Regina-based clothing retailer 22Fresh is selling “Humboldt Strong” shirts, and donating the proceeds to the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League assistance program, which provides mental health support and counselling to players. A spokesperson for the Broncos specified that 22Fresh isn’t an official partner of the Broncos, but of the SJHL, the league in which the Broncos play.

Christa Savietto of Thunder Bay, Ont., has sold homemade knits through her online Etsy shop Norm and Lou since 2008. She says she found herself knitting more often as a way to process the tragic news about the bus crash.

“Knitting is so therapeutic that it kind of gave me a way to channel all those horrible feelings,” she says.

For one week, Savietto decided to donate $10 from the sale of one particular model of hat to the Humboldt Broncos’ GoFundMe page. She sold about 30 hats in that week, putting the total amount raised close to $300. That’s a lot for her small shop, she says, especially because April isn’t typically a very busy time for people to buy winter hats.

The majority of the Etsy shops offering Humboldt Broncos-themed merchandise, including many American ones, say they are donating large percentages of the proceeds, if not the entire cost of the item, to the hockey team’s GoFundMe campaign. For Savietto, that’s indicative of the approach of an independent retailer.

“Almost everybody I’ve bought from on Etsy is a mom,” she says. “It’s not a big business. There are very few sellers on there that are able to stop their regular work.”

“I couldn’t imagine just putting the name ‘Humboldt’ on it just to sell more things.”

Maija Kappler, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

LETTER: All Washington plate owners can’t be Canadian residents

A Maple Ridge man questions presence of U.S. vehicles in the Canada, despite closed borders

Residential real estate market rebounding well: long-time realtor

House prices, sales, and listings in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows are moving on an upward trajectory

Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows are prepared for high Fraser River levels

Peak numbers are expected to be below trigger levels for both cities

‘Protect our jobs,” say laid-off hotel workers to MLA Lisa Beare

Delegation delivered a petition to Maple Ridge MLA office on Friday

LOOKING BACK: A ride down memory lane or in this case Dewdney Trunk Road

Maple Ridge’s museum director offers a history lessson on how the major thoroughfare came to be

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

White-throated sparrows have changed their tune, B.C. study unveils

Study marks an unprecedented development scientists say has caused them to sit up and take note

Greater Vancouver home sales start to tick up, with prices holding steady

Residential sales last month reached 2,443, a 64.5 per cent jump from May

Langley Lodge’s deadly outbreak declared over

Fraser Health and long-term care home administrator confirm Friday declaration

PHOTOS: South Surrey tractor project evokes ‘$1-million smile,’ helps connect neighbours

Retired Surrey firefighter Ron Henze began project for friend’s dad to fill time during pandemic

Most Read