Crews move historic houses from Vancouver to Hammond on Monday.

Heritage boost for Hammond

Two homes, built in the 1930s, arrived from North Vancouver on Monday.

Hammond has welcomed two new additions to the neighbourhood that instantly add to the historic feel to the community.

Two homes built in the 1930s arrived from North Vancouver and, as a result, were spared from the wrecking ball.

“We’re pretty happy that they’re going in and so is the neighbourhood,” said Heather Patterson, who owns the houses along with Sean McQuillan.

The homes were located at 252 and 248 East Fifth St. in North Vancouver and were barged down the Fraser River to the Sylte Shiphard in Hammond, where they touched shore on Monday.

After that, they crept along the Hammond roads on a flat bed trailer, with one of them moved to a vacant lot on 206th Street and the other to a lot nearby on 113th Avenue.

“We really felt that the location we chose reflected the value of the houses,” said Patterson.

It’s also close to the water and there are lots of families.

“Visually, the area really lends itself to heritage homes, of course.”

The houses were built in the 1930s, one for a jeweler the other for an auto body builder.

Patterson said after a foundation or basement has been poured, the houses will be lowered on to the new concrete and renovations will be begin.

Once restoration is complete, pegged at $70,000 each, the pair will see what is the best option.

Patterson said it cost about $150,000 to move each home, while the two lots in Hammond cost about $230,000 each.

She’s worked closely with the City of Maple Ridge, which she says has been helpful.

Hammond resident James Rowley, who’s currently doing his own restoration of a heritage home, says people support the arrival of the new homes.

“I haven’t heard anybody say anything negative. Everyone is excited.”

What people in the area are concerned about are condos and apartment blocks replacing the old homes.

“If we have heritage homes coming in, that strengthens the heritage of the community, I would think.”

Rowley said word is out that Maple Ridge wants to preserve Hammond, which is what attracted Patterson.

“Articulate your dream and it’s that much closer to happening.”

He added that restoring or renovating an old home is more environmentally sustainable than building a new house.

He’s renovating his house as a test case to serve as a model to show how people restore homes economically.

“We’re hoping to lead by example.”

“In sustainability terms, if can keep an old home, going – the greenest house, if you can keep it going, is the one already standing.”

The City of Maple Ridge is currently writing an area plan that will determine how Hammond grows and preserving heritage will be a major part of that plan.

Maple Ridge planner Lisa Zosiak said there were likely different influences on home building in North Vancouver and Hammond during the 1930s. But the pair are following all the zoning requirements and have all the permits.

“At this time, it looks like they’re aligning.”

A concept area plan for Hammond will be ready for council’s review by this fall.

Patterson said she’d like to bring in more homes to further enhance the heritage feel.

“Our dream is to really bring in some beautiful heritage homes, that would have been destroyed, into Hammond, where they’ll be appreciated.”

 

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