Pitt Meadows Marauder Alejandro Canjura plays tight defence against Burnaby Mountain’s Karan Sanghara at the B.C. Boys AAA High School Basketball Championships in March. City councillor Dave Murray will be donating a seven percent salary increase received this year to the team.

Pitt councillor donating raise to basketball teams

Others giving seven per cent annual increase to city's centennial celebrations

Pitt Meadows secondary’s basketball program will be getting an injection of cash this year thanks to a donation from a city councillor.

Coun. David Murray will be donating the seven-per-cent salary increase he received this year to the high school’s Grade 8 and senior teams. It will amount to $1,500, but he’s hoping to stretch the donation by working out a deal with a sporting goods store for new shoes or other equipment.

“I’m going to sit down with coach Rich Goulet and figure out where he needs it to go,” said Murray.

Two weeks ago, city council struggled with a bylaw that recommended the significant increase in their wages while discussing proposed budget cuts and a demand for no new taxes in 2014.

In the end, each member of council decided to donate the whole amount or a portion of the increase back to a local charity.

When he ran for a seat on Pitt Meadows council, Murray pledged to donate all his salary increases to charity. In the past two years, Kids Sports has been a beneficiary.

“Sports is something I’m really passionate about,” he said.

Pitt Meadows Mayor Deb Walters said each councillor will decide how to disclose where their donations will be going.

She will be donating her increase (almost $5,000) to the city’s centennial celebrations, which will take place next year, as will councillors Janis Elkerton and Bruce Bell.

Couns. Tracy Miyashita and Gwen O’Connell have yet to publicly disclose which charities will benefits from their donations. Neither returned calls for comment.

Coun. Doug Bing has not been receiving a salary from the city since he was elected as a member of the provincial legislature in May. He is set to resign his council seat in January.

As per the Council Indemnity Bylaw, council salaries are reviewed on Jan. 1 each year.

The mayor’s salary is then adjusted to 75 per cent of the published median salary of all Metro Vancouver mayors for the preceding year, while councillors make 37.5 per cent of the mayor’s salary.

The pay increases were not determined by council, but recommended by an independent committee, which drafted the bylaw in 2008.

Pitt Meadows council salaries, however, have risen 50 per cent over six years.

In 2013, the mayor will earn $70,864, compared to $47,160 in 2008.

Councillors are set to make $26,574, compared to $17,544 in 2008. Unlike MLAs. No one will get a pension from the city.

 

Just Posted

Sea bus service proposed along Fraser River

Maple Ridge councillor just wants to start discussion

Pitt Meadows gets some help for flood plan

$412,000, but not for dike upgrades

Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows folks take in rides at PNE

Fall exhibition heralds end of summer

Pantracia Chronicles paves path for Pitt Meadows author

First trilogy in epic fantasy series released this year

Homes found for abandoned hedgehogs in Maple Ridge

Lucky new owners picked up their pets on Aug. 20

Pickle me this: All the outrageous foods at this year’s PNE

Pickled cotton candy, deep-fried chicken skins, and ramen corndogs are just a start

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

B.C. father tells judge he did not kill his young daughters

Andrew Berry pleaded not guilty to the December 2017 deaths

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Mammoth sturgeon catch was ‘a fish of a lifetime’ for Chilliwack guide

Sturgeon was so enormous it tied for largest specimen every tagged and released in the Fraser

Rosemount cooked diced chicken linked to listeria case in B.C.

The symptoms of listeria include vomiting, nausea, fever, muscle aches

Body found believed to be missing Chilliwack senior with dementia

Police say case is now in the hands of the coroner

B.C. seniors allowed more choice to stay in assisted living

Province doesn’t need to wait for a complaint to investigate care, Adrian Dix says

Most Read