Nanaimo Courthouse. (News Bulletin file photo)

Nanaimo Courthouse. (News Bulletin file photo)

Vancouver Island man’s $32-trillion lawsuit thrown out by B.C. Supreme Court

Plaintiff from Nanaimo also asked for 500,000 Tesla shares, private audience with the Queen

A Nanaimo man who tried to sue for $32 trillion after being struck by a car while riding his bicycle got his day in court before his case was thrown out.

Tyler Chamberlin filed a lawsuit against ICBC in 2020, according to court documents, alleging that he “suffered physical and emotional injuries” in a 2018 hit-and-run. Since then, he amended his claim, adding as defendants the Queen, the prime minister, the premier, the Supreme Court of B.C., Elections B.C., Nanaimo Regional General Hospital and several other parties.

Judge Douglas Thompson described the plaintiff’s demands as wide-ranging: “It includes a private audience with Her Majesty, the suspension of trade with China, the dismantling of Transport Canada, the postponement of an election, the release of classified documents, the “cleaning up of the swamp,” the reconstruction of the RCMP, an MRI of his entire body, $32 trillion, and 500,000 Tesla shares,” the judge noted.

The hearing March 1 in B.C. Supreme Court in Nanaimo necessitated lawyers for seven defendants to appear via teleconference. Most applied to have the case’s “irregularly filed documents be struck out,” and some asked for an order curtailing the plaintiff from making further court filings.

The judge found Chamberlin’s approach to seeking relief against parties other than ICBC was wrong and said the plaintiff’s claims are not reasonable and are “scandalous, vexatious and otherwise an abuse of process.” However, the judge suggested there is no need for a vexatious litigant order because there have been recent changes to court document filing standards and the judge’s expectation is that the plaintiff “is unlikely to succeed in filing more documents” that conform with the rules.

Only one of the defendants sought reimbursement for legal costs and the judge said he would not make a costs order unless the applicant chooses to press the issue.

READ ALSO: B.C. appealing decision keeping ICBC injury cases in court



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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