OUR VIEW: The education struggle goes on

We say: Court ruling won’t be the last of teacher dispute

Many parents were probably hopeful that last week’s B.C. Court of Appeal decision was the last they’d hear about the provincial government’s seemingly never-ending battle with the BC Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) over the removal of class size and special-needs support formulas from classrooms.

Wishful thinking…

In a judgment Thursday, four of five appeal court judges found that the province did not infringe on the constitutional rights of teachers to bargain working conditions.

It was a stinging rebuke to the teachers’ union, finding that the government has the authority to set class sizes and special needs support in public schools, and that it didn’t bargain in bad faith.

Regardless, the BCTF said it will try to take the case to the Supreme Court of Canada, and the historical shoving match between Victoria and the BCTF will see yet another chapter.

While no one would argue that class sizes should be left to expand without limits, and while support for special-needs children is vital to give those kids the tools they need to become healthy adults, both issues should not be decided by unions, contract negotiators, and subsequently, lawyers and courts.

These issues are at the core of education policy and the type of learning environments provided for our children – in context of what is reasonable, affordable and sustainable over the long-term.

To take this out of the hands of the public’s elected representatives – whatever their political stripes – and expect the courts to be the champions of kids through an interpretation of law, isn’t good for anyone.

The public has the ability to express and test its education values as a priority at the ballot box.

It’s how democracy should work.

-Black Press

Just Posted

Maple Ridge councillors named to local groups

Division of labour for new council

Operation Red Nose ready for 11th year in Maple Ridge, Pitt Meadows

The new host organization this year is Kidsport Maple Ridge/Pitt Meadows.

Gardening: George and the family berry plan

Pitt Meadows family’s farm roots go back to 1925.

Letter: Premier has ‘no clue’ on PR

Or Horgan is deliberately hiding his intentions.

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

Clear skies for Fraser Blues Remembrance Day flyby

It was the first time the formation team flew over the Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows Remembrance Day ceremonies

Most fatal overdose victims did not have recent police contact: Stats Canada

11 per cent of those who fatally overdosed in B.C. had four or more contacts with the police

5 to start your day

One left dead after Abbotsford shooting, touching note left on Langley veteran’s windshield and more

Calgarians head to the polls to declare ‘yea’ or ‘nay’ on Winter Games

The question “are you for or are you against hosting the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games?” was to be posed to them Tuesday in a plebiscite to help determine whether the city should move ahead with a bid.

Heir’s big birthday: 70 candles lined up for Prince Charles

Prince Charles turns 70 Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, still serving in the heir to the throne role he has filled since he was a young child.

Trudeau lays down challenge to companies in bid to boost trade with Asia

“Building the relationships, building the connections, building the facility and also changing mindsets — getting Canadian companies to see the opportunities we have around the world to partner and invest.”

One person sent to hospital after incident at Langley gas station

Police observed retrieving what appeared to be an exacto knife

CNN sues Trump, demanding return of Acosta to White House

CNN is asking for an immediate restraining order to return Acosta to the White House.

Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Most Read