A team of gleaners harvested fruit to reduce attractants to bears. The fruit is being used to feed orphaned cubs. (Contributed)

Maple Ridge Bears group volunteer gleaners

Group will harvest fruit and berries to remove attractants

A group of citizens concerned about the number of bears getting killed in Maple Ridge is offering to help pick fruit and berries to get rid of attractants.

The Maple Ridge Bears group, which formed in social media over bear shootings, is moving forward with several projects to prevent the unnecessary killing of our bears.

They are offering people who may have these natural attractants on their properties if they need help with their harvest.

“Maple Ridge Bears Facebook group is ready to go,” said organizer Susan Zanders in a press release. “Contact them on Facebook and let them know where and what you have. Last night they were out in Maple Ridge and picked a plum and apple tree, with all the delights going to the orphaned cubs at Critter Care Wildlife.”

The group started earlier this year as Silver Valley Bears, after a number of bears were killed by Conservation Officers, having been deemed a danger to humans.Zanders said the Silver Valley community was outraged by the bear shooting, and there have been initiatives by the Silver Valley Bears group to reduce the number people setting out their garbage the evening before pickup.

“We have just recently expanded to all of Maple Ridge and our group is now called Maple Ridge Bears,” she said. “We feel that now we are ready for other areas to come together and make the difference in the unnecessary bear killings.”

She said the group can arrange a team to come, out for no charge, to pick fruit and berries for the orphaned bear cubs at the Critter Care facility in Langley.

“Our team is looking for support, ideas and people who would like to volunteer and make a difference,” she added.

As summer comes to end, bears are starting their preparation for hibernation. Earlier in the year if food and water is available, a bear will consume between 5,000-8,000 calories each day. As they start to fatten themselves up for hibernation, they may eat as much as 20,000 calories per day.

“At this stage they actively look for food. The time is now and we are starting to see them more around,” she said. “We are in a critical time to keep them in the mountains and not provide anything that may enhance their diet.”


 


ncorbett@mapleridgenews.com

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